afternoons

Illustration Friday: natural

Call it backlogged with life, art, exercise, and family. Blogging, or sharing, has taken a backseat. While reading my daily dose of NYT, I came across this great op-ed essay. This portion pulled at me:

I also realize that spirituality and making art are not such different practices. Both call upon the animating force of the unseen. As a writer, I can’t really explain it, either, what I do or how; when I work, I may look like someone staring uselessly into space.
— "Is God Just Not That Into Me?", Stacey D’Erasmo, Modern Love section of New York Times

My tall German girlfriend, also a private yoga teacher to the Malibu elite and fabulous, and I used to spend our afternoons talking about Buddhism, Hinduism, mothering, spirituality, and mindfulness, while we ate raw avocados sitting across from each other on park benches and felt the Southern California sun on our faces and exposed arms. When I perform yoga each day I think of her and that warmth. We haven't seen each other in over a year but still write when we get a chance. We're not the social media type--her an ocean gal; me a woodsy gal; we're offline most often.

As I've been spending nearly all my time in the studio working on a larger piece of work, I think this little illustration is appropriate for Illustration Friday. She mediates starting at 3:30 in the morning. I begin drawing at 5 in the morning. Art is my meditation as I drift into a space way beyond myself. Do you have a space like that?

 

Buddhist Mantra of Sternum Bloat . Mixed media on paper. 2014.

Buddhist Mantra of Sternum Bloat. Mixed media on paper. 2014.

brace yourself for tiny moments

Recap of mini proportions: a Saturday afternoon impromptu drawing session with daughter (see below), a trip to a new library (ahoy graphic novel section for adults!), and the publishing of a new illustration at The Hairpin called "The Yoga-Juice Continuum." 

 

Sometimes posts are not always timely when you're unplugged most of the day.  My little girl spread out blankets in the woods and asked me to draw blind contours with her. How could I say no.....

Sometimes posts are not always timely when you're unplugged most of the day.  My little girl spread out blankets in the woods and asked me to draw blind contours with her. How could I say no.....

Books on my desk that I will read with fever: 

Go find something to watch, some pavement/trail to pound or carve....and make it a good day. Thanks for stopping by once again.

rainforest on your tongue

Life out take 1. If you too like creativity and new tastes, buy a little rainforest for the tongue. Product consumed and enjoyed: Organic Jade Pearl Rice by Lotus Foods.

Life out take 2. The other day I conducted an art literary and workshop on Georges Seurat's pointillism and his giant painting "A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte" to a class of little kids. A tape measure, enthusiasm, Q-tips, tempura paint, and intense concentration pervaded our space. They produced some masterpieces. It's so much fun to see how they each take the concept and run with it in their own imagination. 

I reuse glass jars. Xanthan gum needed a place to live in the pantry. Thank you old Masala jar.

I reuse glass jars. Xanthan gum needed a place to live in the pantry. Thank you old Masala jar.

 

 

Brand Ambassador

The new issue of Backpacker arrived. Post Thanksgiving glut and rush, I had a chance to sit down after the gym to crack its cover. In the Trailhead section the magazine has a casting call for Brand Ambassadors for Backpacker. Holy awesome. I read the guidelines. It's for the ultimate vagabond, which I am not right now. If anyone has time to travel and become a spokesperson, this might be the job for you! Check it out....

One person's adventure is another person's lazy afternoon.....

the art of (park)ing it

When I say "parking" here, today, I do not mean making out/sucking face in a car (or that's what we used to refer to it back in the day). I presumme the kids of Betches Love This era don't use the term anymore. However, what I mean, is actually sitting in a park, parking my arse in one place, and opening up a satchel with notebook, watercolors, and snacks for an afternoon.

I have had many attempts at this. In city parks, it almost always invited strangers to circle me as vultures and land across from me, or in one brazen case, a wayward kid sat down right on my blanket, asked if he could have a piece of paper too, and wanted to draw (rather than play football with his Pops). 

In this particular instance, I had nothing in mind (see little diagram right here). But after talking with a woman from South Africa for 45 minutes and doodling, I ended up with this little sketch in the book. If you doodle in public, beware: it's almost like people want to confess their souls to you and then ponder why they ever gave up art as a kid. Perhaps its a good intersection of quicksand friendships.